Is It Cheaper To Buy New Furniture Or Move It?

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Is It Cheaper To Buy New Furniture Or Move It?

While you may not have the option to move, or not to move; you do have the option of how you do it.

There are all kinds of ways to move depending on what you’re moving and how much you have. Professional movers are a lifesaver for cutting out all that moving stress that every person dreads.

When it comes to moves across the country however, things can get a little more complicated. You shouldn’t assume that local movers are experts in long distance moves. Instead, take the time to invest in good, quality, out of state movers to provide the very best service.

Before you do, however, decide how much you actually have to move. One common question with long-distance moves is whether it is even worth your money to move your furniture in the first place, or if you should just move without it. 

How much does it cost to move?

That depends. Are you moving locally or out of state? While every move, in every city, in every state is different, the average costs of moving go like this:

For a local move under 100 miles away, you can expect to pay two movers for approximately $80 to $100 an hour. On the other hand, for an out of state that is more than 100 miles away, expenses typically range from $2000 to $5000, with the average cost being $4300 for a three-bedroom home. 

Where does all that come from you ask? Moving is about more than just paying the movers, so here are a few expenses that you might run into:

  • First month’s rent (or more)
  • Security deposits
  • Utility deposits + first month’s utilities
  • Management fees
  • Pet deposit
  • Cleaning fees
  • Packing supplies
  • Moving fees (professional or friends, you’ll be paying someone)
  • Storage unit fees
  • Gas for the move
  • Hotel fare (for long distance moves that require multiple days of travel)
  • New furniture (if you decide so) 

How much does it cost to ship furniture? 

Deciding whether to keep your furniture or buy new also heavily relies on how much it costs to get it there.

When you don’t have many belongings, you might not need a rental truck, but what do you do with bigger items?

Shipping them is one option.

You would be surprised by how many carriers offer furniture shipping. If you use a local business this might cost you around $75 to $250 per item, with the average costs being $300 to $600.

There are other services that come with shipping your furniture such as, white glove delivery, tracking, extra long distance, etc. 

Should I buy new furniture or move it? 

With all these expenses in mind, it might be hard to even consider buying new furniture, but you’d be surprised by how much more money it can save you in the long run.

When it comes to keeping the old or buying new furniture, it comes down to three factors: value, function, and ability to move. Here are some things to consider:

Value 

The value of your old furniture can come in various forms. There’s monetary value, sentimental value, and functional value. Ask yourself this:

  • Is it stylish or beautiful, something you want to hold onto?
  • Does it evoke positive memories?
  • Was it expensive?
  • Is it an antique or collector’s item?
  • Is it still comfortable?
  • Is it durable enough to last during the move?

Function

If you’re considering saving a piece of furniture, it should at the very least still be usable, but there’s more to it than that.

  • Is it in good condition?
  • Does it still work?
  • Does it need cleaning or repairs?
  • Does it fit with your new home?

Ability to move

There’s plenty of risks when you move anything, especially long-distance, so be sure to evaluate the risk before moving expensive furniture.

  • How far is the relocation distance?
  • How many people does it take to move it?
  • Is it easy to move (Or awkwardly shaped)?
  • Is it too delicate to survive the move?

With all that in mind, here’s the bottom line.

If it requires more time and money to pack up and prepare the item to move than the item is actually worth, then buy new. On the other hand, if it would cost the same or more to buy the exact same item new, keep the old.

Moving companies will often tack on extra fees for specialty items and items that take longer to move. In the end, it’s your choice how much that piece of furniture means to you, but if it’s been a while since you’ve even used it, now would be the best time to leave it behind.

Frequently Asked Questions 

  1. How do I get an estimate? 

While a budget calculator might be a helpful tool in knowing what to predict for your move, that doesn’t count as an estimate. A phone estimate is also helpful, but it doesn’t cut it. In order to get a true estimate, it must be done on-site by contacting the company and scheduling one. Only by visually seeing your stuff and your home, can professionals make an estimate.

  1. Can I request a re-weigh?

Typically the weighing of your moving truck is not done in front of you. You have the right to be there when it is, but if you suspect something is wrong or the weight is off, you can request a reweigh. Keep in mind that the total will always be based on the reweighing, not the lightest weight or the original one.

  1. What if I need to change the dates of my move?

If anything in your schedule changes before the actual move, contact your moving company right away. You can make changes in moving, moving dates, etc. just be sure to give plenty of notice. On the other hand, if your mover is late for any reason, you might be able to claim

Mark Emond
Mark Emond
Mark Emond is a professional writer with an extensive background in the moving industry and its copywriting. He is known for his informative and technologically abreast writing and creating user-engaging content to help both companies and individuals sort their moving-related queries. He maintains a good knowledge base and is always excited to share his knowledge with readers.
Mark Emond
Mark Emond
Mark Emond is a professional writer with an extensive background in the moving industry and its copywriting. He is known for his informative and technologically abreast writing and creating user-engaging content to help both companies and individuals sort their moving-related queries. He maintains a good knowledge base and is always excited to share his knowledge with readers.

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